Art 3 – Figure in a setting / woodcut style – due 2/21

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Look and read about each of these four links before you start your project.

Edward Hopper and cinema

Hopper and Hitchcock

Hopper at MOMA and East Side Interior

Martin Lewis prints

Comment on what interests you about each of the sites.  Also share ideas which you have for creating an ink drawing with contour, cross contour, and cross-hatching with influence by Hopper, film noir and/or cinema. How will you create a “cinematic” view?

Make sure you bring 2 personal images to work from (figure and setting) for 2/21.

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6 responses »

  1. I am inspired by Martin Lewis’ print Speakeasy Corner. I don’t quite understand the technique you want us to use for this next piece, but I think the style that Lewis will help me accomplish the goal(s) of this project. I thought the connection between Hitchcock’s cinematic scenes and Hopper’s paintings were really fascinating and cool. For reason I don’t know, I had never considered paintings and movie scenes to be very similar, so that article opened my eyes. Especially at how Hitch’s love and admiration for Hopper’s pieces really translated in his movies and vise versa for Hopper.

  2. I think the phrase ‘Rembrandt lighting’ is very interesting and could be a good way to summarize what these illustrations have in common–they all have dramatic lightings. The pieces I like most are ‘Stoops in Snow’ and ‘Rainy Day In Queens’ by Martin Lewis. Comparing to the other pieces, they have more of a delicate sense due to the smooth lining. I like Hopper’s colored illustrations to, but not so much for the black&white ones…they’re little bit too rough, too sketchy for me. Just as Klimt said, these articles did open my eyes. I used to think the paintings of the settings were only for cartoon animations, but now I know they could be produced for any kind of movies, that’s cool.I’m thinking about doing street scenes in some European cities…like Paris (because of those antique architect and sidewalk cafes), but I don’t have the exact movie picked yet.

    • My comment disappeared somewhere so hopefully, I’m not repeating here….. The narrative you choose to portray is of your own creation (you are not illustrating a movie already made). You create the cinematic feel by combining the figure and setting from personal photos. Then it is your imagined narrative. It is common for Rembrandt’s paintings to be referred to as “cinematic” even though they predate cinema by centuries. Actually, cinema took its lead from the Baroque painters like Rembrandt. And, the dramatic lighting is key to the emotional effect as well as a successful composition.

    • My comment disappeared somewhere so hopefully, I’m not repeating here….. The narrative you choose to portray is of your own creation (you are not illustrating a movie already made). You create the cinematic feel by combining the figure and setting from personal photos. Then it is your imagined narrative. It is common for Rembrandt’s paintings to be referred to as “cinematic” even though they predate cinema by centuries. Actually, cinema took its lead from the Baroque painters like Rembrandt.

  3. I have never fully appreciated or thought about the potential symbiotic relationship between art and film and between artists and filmmakers. I found it very interesting to learn how Hopper and Hitchcock influenced one another and how they “conversed” through their art and films (respectively). I was also very interested in Lewis’ work. I loved the ways in which he contrasted both lights and darks and the ways in which he captured light reflecting off of water. In both Hopper and Lewis’ work, I found it fascinating how the works of art captured the viewers’ interest and attention, forcing them to wonder what the story was behind the single moment captured in the painting or sketch. I hope to create a composition with similar dramatic lighting and intriguing subject matter.

  4. I really love the noir-esque quality of Hopper and Lewis’ work. I’d never made the connection in the stylistic commonality between Hopper and Hitchcock and other noir films. I also really enjoyed learning more about Hopper’s background and where his inspiration came from. I’d never heard of Martin Lewis either, and I really love how hazy the images are and how much they look like photographs. I’d love to create a piece with the realistic yet stylistic portrayal of subjects.

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