ART 3 – Portrait styles – Due 10/2

Standard

1. Look at the following blog post on Francoise Gilot and the variable thickness in the expressive contour lines.

francoise-gilot.html

2. Look at Google images for Francoise Gilot portrait drawings: http://www.google.com/search?q=gilot+portraits&client=safari&rls=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=FWpKUtjWCvGFyQH6m4HIDA&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=679&dpr=1

Picasso portrait drawings: http://www.google.com/search?q=picasso+portrait+drawings&client=safari&rls=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=hGpKUoj2CceYqwH-rYBw&ved=0CCsQsAQ&biw=1440&bih=679&dpr=1

and Andy Warhol drawings: http://www.google.com/search?q=warhol+portrait+drawings&client=safari&rls=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=vmpKUqOKKcqArAGUtYH4Bw&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1440&bih=679&dpr=1

Look especially at the contour line drawings by Gilot, portraits of Jaqueline by Picasso, and the color and shapes used by Warhol.

3. In the videos below, look at the speed drawing and the portraits by Warhol. When the drawing starts to talk, you can just listen to the interview if it is too wierd for you.  Also enjoy the David Byrne music accompanying the Warhol imagery in the second selection.

4. Post your favorite portrait drawing from any of these  sources and any other artists (black and white or color, linear or painterly.) Explain what makes the drawing expressive and how you might incorporate some of the techniques into your portrait “derivatives.”

 
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12 responses »

  1. I like the following portrait drawn by Pablo Picasso because of the contrast between the expressive and wild lines of the hair and the almost bored expression of Gilot herself. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_TWlf_e5Ud5A/ScFUTYTMaAI/AAAAAAAAMPo/ahIklBEydZU/s400/PicassoFrancoiseGilot.jpg
    The following portrait was painted by Patrice Federspiel. (It is of me when I was about eight years old). I like how Patrice changed the hair into palm fronds and how she added touches of purple into the highlights and shading.
    http://www.artofaloha.com/palm-frond-series/single-gallery/1562418
    In both of the above portraits, the hair seems to have a life of its own. In my own portrait, I would like to experiment with the hair and possibly use exaggerated colors to portray highlights and shadows.

    • What a wonderful portrait of you by Federspiel! Her work would also be a good reference for the Art 2 students looking at watrcolor botanicals. Her interest in complex compositions from nature and control of the medium reminds me a lot of the intricacy of Forrester’s work. It would be great to play with the hair as both of these portraits do, finding a happy balance between the immediacy of drawing and the dimension that color adds through painting.

  2. It’s really difficult for me to pick my favorite portraits, but I really love the Picasso portrait of Stravinsky (http://www.jeffreymarshall.net/TEACHING2008/DP/IMAGES/picasso_stravinsky.jpg), Gilot self-portrait (http://assets4.designsponge.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/gilotmain.jpg?73626), and the following Warhol portraits – http://de.phaidon.com/resource/warhol-sketch-620×465.jpg and http://data3.whicdn.com/images/31247601/andy-warhol-drawing-girl-painting-pink-Favim.com-451005_thumb.jpg . All of them are so well styled and evocative of the individuals personality. I love that even though they’re not necessarily visually accurate, they still show you who the person is. Showing the character and feel of a subject is something I really love to embrace.

    Though they’re not necessarily portraits per se, I love Picasso’s mask-esque drawings and paintings of people (http://assets.blog.sfmoma.org/public/uploads/2010/01/Picasso-3_4-Head1.png). They’re expressive.

    Ego Schiele’s portraits are lovely as well. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/schiele/schiele.self-portrait.jpg His lines are really simple but really alive.

    I really love all of Klimt’s portraits too. They’re incredibly lively and balance strong colors with delicate use. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f0/Gustav_Klimt_Portrait_of_Helene_Klimt_(his_niece).jpg

  3. http://th08.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/f/2010/327/c/7/jimi_hendrix_portrait_drawing_by_kendra422e-d33hf71.jpg—-> I chose this image because of the way the artist was able to capture the texture of the afro hair. During my self portrait, I had a difficult time trying to make my hair look coily so this is a good example of how to do it. The artist also did a spectacular job at making the mouth and eyes protrude off the page in a way that made them more realistic and come to life. The shading of the chek bones seem a little too dramatic though, but they capture the essence of the man’s face very well.


  4. I like this portrait by Asian artist Liu Ye because of the tone and the way how colors are nicely blended. I also like how he slightly but not over cartooned the person. He’s inspired by Dick Bruna and Mondrian, you can see how he combine his own style with the elements that are extracted from these two great artists.
    http://elsa-may.blogspot.com/2011/11/weekly-whatnots.html
    I also like this portrait a lot, and I think this is what I want to do to my derivative portrait. I love its simplicity and how it accurately caught the character’s features.

    • Thanks for introducing me to Ye’s work – is he influenced by early Mondrian? His work has a lot of the observational presence your current portrait has. The portrait you linked us to is the Francoise Gilot portrait from the first link – full circle! I love this one too.

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